Post: Ayrnet PO Box 8686 SALTCOATS KA21 9AD
Ayrshire Network Solutions
Ayrshire Network Solutions Ltd is a company limited by guarantee and registered in Scotland under Company Number SC345188 at Wallace House, 14 Glebe Street, Stevenston, Ayrshire, KA20 3EN.  VAT Registration Number 181871095
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01294 467962
Ayrnet Group
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Visit: Wallace House 14 Glebe Street Stevenston Ayrshire KA20 3EN
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Ayrshire Network Solutions (better known as Ayrnet) was formed as a Social Enterprise in 2005 providing the Third Sector with ICT Support and PAT Testing services. Since then we have grown and diversified now providing a full range of safety services, including Electrical Inspection and Testing Services, Emergency Lighting design and testing and Fire Extinguisher Maintenance to customers across Scotland from Dumfries and Galloway all the way north to Sutherland, Elgin and Aberdeen.
We relocated to new premises in Glebe Street, Stevenston in May 2012 providing a more flexible working environment for our team as our steady expansion continues. Our staff have grown in experience as well as numbers, creating our sister companies, Ayrnet Marketing Ltd. and Ayrnet IT. Ayrnet are widely considered as a “safe pair of hands” in the industry holding contracts with Private, Third Sector and Local Authorities. We may not be the cheapest quote you will get, but very few can match us on innovation, attention to detail and customer service. We are in business to make a living, not a killing and many of our customers have been with us for over 10 years. Our competitors have tried to copy us, match us and even say they are us to get work…. something that we are very proud of. We provide a comprehensive and professional service, paying great attention to causing minimal disruption as well as providing great value, always with a smile. Ayrnet were also early members of the Supplier Development Programme where some of our work features in this video link, (If you want to fast forward to see us, we are 3:57 minutes into the video). Some of the processes used back then are dated now with iPads replacing clipboards and paper and our testing machines now state of the art, but for us, it's a measure of how we have evolved over the years.
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Ayrnet Competition
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Portable Fire Extinguisher Maintenance
Fire Alarm Testing
Emergency Escape Light Testing
Electrical Inspection & Testing
RegulationsElectrical Inspection & TestingPortable Appliance Testing (PAT) is the term used to describe the examination of electrical appliances and equipment to ensure they are safe to use. Most electrical safety defects can be found by visual examination but some types of defect can only be found by testing. A relatively brief user check (based upon simple training and perhaps assisted by the use of a brief (checklist) can be a very useful part of any electrical maintenance regime. However, more formal visual inspection and testing by a competent person may also be required at appropriate intervals, depending upon the type of equipment and the environment in which it is used. The frequency of inspection and testing depends upon the type of equipment and the environment it is used in. For example, a power tool used on a construction site should be examined more frequently than a desk lamp in an office. There is no legal requirement to label equipment that has been inspected or tested, nor is there a requirement to keep records of these activities. However, keeping records combined with properly labelled appliances can be a useful management tool for monitoring and reviewing the effectiveness of the maintenance scheme – and to demonstrate that a scheme exists. The law simply requires an employer to ensure that their electrical equipment is maintained in order to prevent danger. It does not say how this should be done or how often. Employers should take a risk-based approach, considering the type of equipment and what it is being used for. If it is used or moved regularly e.g. a floor cleaner or a kettle, testing (along with visual checks) can be an important part of an effective maintenance regime giving employers confidence that they are doing what is necessary to help them meet their legal duties. HSE provides guidance on how to maintain equipment including the use of PAT and we have provided a small library below for your information. Fire Fighting and Facilities on PremisesAll premises should be provided with a means for fighting fires that can be easily and safely used by the occupants. The following information may give you guidance under Article 13 of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. It is without prejudice to anything which may be required by an enforcing authority. In deciding the appropriate type and quantity of such equipment, consideration should be given to the size of the building and the nature of the materials likely to be found there. It must be remembered that extinguishers are provided primarily for use by suitably trained persons to tackle a fire in its early stages. New fire extinguishers must conform to British Standard EN3, which requires all extinguishers to: Be coloured red;To have a zone or block of colour, comprising 5% of the body, whose purpose is to indicate the type of extinguishing medium. This block should be located on the front of the extinguisher so that it can be seen from 180° when correctly mounted;Have a capacity of 1, 2, 3, 6, or 9 litres / kg; andUse standard labelling using pictorials to describe the fire classification and use.Note: Existing fire extinguishers conforming to BS 5423 remain acceptable until such times as they need to be replaced at the end of their useful life. Fires are classified in accordance with British Standard EN 2 as follows:   Class A Fires involving solid materials where combustion normally takes place with the formation of glowing embers.Class B Fires involving liquids or liquefiable solids.Class C Fires involving gases.Class D Fires involving metals.Class F Fires involving cooking oils or fats.Portable Extinguishers - Siting Whenever possible portable fire fighting equipment should be grouped to form a fire point. The fire point should be clearly indicated so that it can be readily identified. In premises that are uniform in layout extinguishers should, whenever possible, be located at the same point on each floor. If for any reason extinguishers are placed in positions hidden from direct view their position should be indicated by suitable signs, as described in BS 5499 : Parts 1 and 3. Examples of correct signage: No person should have to travel more than 30 metres from the site of a fire to reach an extinguisher. Location of Portable Fire Fighting Equipment Extinguishers should be sited in conspicuous positions where they are visible to anyone using an escape route.They should be mounted on brackets fixed to the wall or some other convenient structural feature.Ideally, larger extinguishers should be mounted so that they can be conveniently de-mounted for use without undue effort or risk of injury. In effect, this will mean mounting the extinguisher with the handle no more than 1m from the floor but, circumstances may dictate variations from this recommendation.Smaller and more easily handled extinguishers may be mounted with the handle about 1.5m from the floor level.Suitably constructed floor cradles may be acceptable in certain locations.Where there are special risks, extinguishers should be grouped conveniently in positions where any user will not be placed in danger whilst attempting to use them.Other suitable positions include near exits to rooms or storeys, corridors or lobbies, stairways and landings.Extinguishers should not be sited behind doors or inaccessible positions such as deep recesses or in cupboards.It is also necessary to consider their exposure to extremes of heat or cold as well as the risk of accidental damage during the normal day-to-day use of the premises. The operation of an extinguisher will be affected by temperature and this could even cause accidental discharge.In premises where theft and vandalism are a problem, extinguishers may be located in secure areas, but always under the supervision of trained staff. Maintenance and Testing of Emergency Escape LightingThe Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 requires that appropriate testing is performed to maintain compliance of the system. The system should include adequate facilities for testing and recording the system condition. These need to be appropriate for the specific site and should be considered as part of the system design. Most existing systems will need to be manually tested. However, some modern systems have self-testing facilities that reduce routine checks to a minimum. Depending on your type of installation you should be able to carry out most of the routine tests yourself. The test method will vary. If you are not sure how to carry out these tests you should contact your supplier or other competent person. Test facilities often take the form of a ‘fishtail’ test key inserted in a special switch either near the main fuse board or adjacent to relevant light switches. Typically, testing would include: a daily visual check of any central controlsa monthly function test by operating the test facility for a period sufficient to ensure that each emergency lamp illuminatesan annual full discharge test.Particular care needs to be taken following a full discharge test. Batteries typically take 24 hours to re-charge and the premises should not be re-occupied until the emergency lighting system is fully functioning unless alternative arrangements have been made. See BS 5266-827 for more information. It is good practice to keep a record of tests – a fire safety logbook is commonly used for this purpose.  
Ayrnet Marketing Ltd
AML provide Marketing and Public Relations services across a wide range of sectors throughout the British Isles. 
Ayrnet IT Ltd
AIT provide a comprehensive and reliable service for IT Maintenance including Procurement across the West of Scotland.
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Company Name * Address * Postcode * Contact Name * Telephone Number Email Address * Month PAT Testing due * Approx. number of appliances * Price currently paid per appliance or Total price currently paid Current PAT Testing company used Month Emergency Lighting Annual Maintenance Testing due Month Annual Fire Extinguisher Maintenance due Other comments  
Competition winners will be contacted by telephone or visit and have their (single site) establishment PAT Tested for FREE. There is no contract, obligation or guilt trip to continue to use us in the future and you will receive all documentation, including a Safety Certificate via an email link for download in PDF format making your records easy to access for anyone in your organisation who you assign the password to.     We won’t bombard you with sales or follow up calls but we will send you a no obligation estimate if you don’t win the competition and we will not use your details in any other way. Depending on the response, we may run this competition more than once a year, so why not bookmark our page.
The date of testing for competition winner may be before but no later than your normal renewal date for PAT Testing. We reserve the right to exclude our competitors from entering the competition. Well that would just be daft now, wouldn’t it !
Electrical Inspection & TestingThe cost for getting a green label on your electrical equipment these days can considerable. This testing is commonly known as PAT (Portable Appliance Testing) but covers static equipment as well. There are also Health & Safety guidelines that should be followed if any of your appliances are being used by members of the public and irrespective of who carries out your PAT Testing, you have a responsibility to carry out regular visual checks too. Our fully qualified technicians are trained to test your equipment at a time to suit you and to be as unobtrusive as possible. We use state of the art equipment to test and log your appliances. The testers that we use are said to be amongst the fastest in the world and carry out the following tests to give you peace of mind. Depending on the type of appliance these are the tests we carry out.... Earth Continuity This test checks that the connection betwesen the earth pin in the mains plug of the appliance and the metal casing of the appliance is satisfactory and is of sufficiently low resistance. Insulation Resistance This is used to verify that the mains supply pins are adequately insulated from earth. IEC Lead Test IEC Leads are tested in 3 stages for continuity, insulation and polarity. Protective Earth Conductor Current This test displays the current flowing down the earth line of the EUT. This is measured by looking at the difference in current flowing in the live and neutral conductors. Touch Current This displays the current that would flow if a person touched the appliance. PAT Testing Process The perception held that PAT Testing is sticking a plug into a machine couldn’t be much further from the truth. We have found that over 80% of faults have been identified by a Formal Visual Inspection. Sadly, this is something that many companies regularly skip to trim costs. We have put together a file for you to download here that covers the basics, but it is important that you entrust the safety of your environment to experienced and meticulous testers at Ayrnet. Every unmoulded plug must be opened and checked and should look like this…
Portable Fire Extinguisher MaintenanceAnnual Servicing It’s not just common sense, but a requirement to have your Fire Extinguishers maintained and serviced annually. Ayrnet’s technicians are all qualified to the British Approvals for Fire Equipment (BAFE) standards and provide a comprehensive service to our clients without asking them to pay over the odds. Furthermore, we do not charge a call out fee for annual maintenance and we never suggest replacement extinguishers without a valid reason. This sets us apart from many in our industry. This is the way we do business. Many of our customers have been with us for the 10 years that we have been going because we have built our reputation upon winning their trust. Anyone working for Ayrnet will have completed a gruelling Customer First training programme and will have bought into our ethos of being honest and capable professionals. When a replacement actually is necessary, our customers benefit from our procuring quality equipment in bulk at wholesale prices. We do not believe that our customers should have to boost our profits for this, so we work very hard in securing the best deals with the top suppliers. Maintenance Process Our technician will check for dents, rust, cracks, pressure gauge operation, safety pin being straight (a bent pin will not come out!), anti-tamper seals intact, correct weights, blocked, worn or cracked hose, discharge test dates, head-cap degradation, replace o-rings and washers, check pressure relief valves, location, wall-mounting, labelling, etc. Upon completion, a maintenance label will be stuck on the back with the correct information filled in. This label will have the service company contact details on it. In addition, we will email you a thorough report & certificate in PDF format detailing the work that was done and the parts used as well as filling in your fire log book. Fire Warden / Marshall Training You can comply with the law and keep your Fire Extinguishers fully maintained and operational, but without trained Fire Wardens or Fire Marshalls, your equipment and safety can be in the hands of novices. Ayrnet Marketing our sister company carry out this training either at your place of work or in our Conference Room in Stevenston to enable your key staff to understand the importance of this knowledge. The trainers are all BAFE qualified with a minimum of 10 years’ training experience and hold the Level 3 Award in Education & Training (PTLLS). The courses last for 2 hours, are relaxed, informative with delegates receiving concise, jargon free handouts as reference material. At the end of the course, everyone will know their responsibilities and have the confidence to carry them out safely. This training can be built into your maintenance agreement with us, saving you even further.
Emergency Escape Lighting Emergency lighting is lighting for an emergency situation when the main power supply is cut and any normal illumination fails. The loss of mains electricity could be the result of a fire or a power cut and the normal lighting supplies fail. This may lead to sudden darkness and a possible danger to the occupants, either through physical danger or panic. Emergency lighting is normally required to operate fully automatically and give illumination of a sufficiently high level to enable all occupants to evacuate the premises safely. Most new buildings now have emergency lighting installed during construction; the design and type of equipment being specified by the architect in accordance with current Building Regulations and any local authority requirements. The British Standard provides the emergency lighting designer with clear guidelines to work to. BS 5266-1: 2011 embraces residential hotels, clubs, hospitals, nursing homes, schools and colleges, licensed premises, offices, museums, shops, multi-storey dwellings, etc. Although this standard recommends the types and durations of emergency lighting systems relating to each category of premises, it should be remembered that the standards are the minimum safe standards for these types of building and that a higher standard may be required for a particular installation. Emergency Escape Lighting – that part of an emergency lighting system that provides illumination for the safety of people leaving a location or attempting to terminate a potentially dangerous process beforehand. It is part of the fire safety provision of a building and a requirement of The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. Standby Lighting – that part of an emergency lighting system provided to enable normal activities to continue substantially unchanged. This guide does not include standby lighting as it is not a legal requirement and is a facility that may or may not be needed, depending on the use and occupancy of the premises, etc. Escape Route Lighting – that part of an emergency escape lighting system provided to ensure that the means of escape can be effectively identified and safely used by occupants of the building. Ayrnet technicians are trained by and qualified to the Fire Industry Association to design and test Emergency Lighting. We provide  a comprehensive Fire Safety service ensuring that you have peace of mind that you are compliant and providing a safe environment for your employees and visitors.
We relocated to new premises in Glebe Street, Stevenston in May 2012 providing a more flexible working environment for our team as our steady expansion continues. Our staff have grown in experience as well as numbers, creating our sister companies, Ayrnet Marketing Ltd. and Ayrnet IT. Ayrnet are widely considered as a “safe pair of hands” in the industry holding contracts with Private, Third Sector and Local Authorities. We may not be the cheapest quote you will get, but very few can match us on innovation, attention to detail and customer service. We are in business to make a living, not a killing and many of our customers have been with us for over 10 years. Our competitors have tried to copy us, match us and even say they are us to get work…. something that we are very proud of. We provide a comprehensive and professional service, paying great attention to causing minimal disruption as well as providing great value, always with a smile. Ayrnet were also early members of the Supplier Development Programme where some of our work features in this video link, (If you want to fast forward to see us, we are 3:57 minutes into the video). Some of the processes used back then are dated now with iPads replacing clipboards and paper and our testing machines now state of the art, but for us, it's a measure of how we have evolved over the years.
Ayrshire Network Solutions (better known as Ayrnet) was formed as a Social Enterprise in 2005 providing the Third Sector with ICT Support and PAT Testing services.  Since then we have grown and diversified now providing a full range of safety services, including Electrical Inspection and Testing Services, Emergency Lighting design and testing and Fire Extinguisher Maintenance to customers across Scotland from Dumfries and Galloway all the way north to Sutherland, Elgin and Aberdeen.
Emergency Escape Light Testing
Portable Fire Extinguisher Maintenance
Electrical Inspection & Testing
Electrical Inspection and Testing
The cost for getting a green label on your electrical equipment these days can considerable. This testing is commonly known as PAT (Portable Appliance Testing) but covers static equipment as well. There are also Health & Safety guidelines that should be followed if any of your appliances are being used by members of the public and irrespective of who carries out your PAT Testing, you have a responsibility to carry out regular visual checks too. Our fully qualified technicians are trained to test your equipment at a time to suit you and to be as unobtrusive as possible.  We use state of the art equipment to test and log your appliances. The testers that we use are said to be amongst the fastest in the world and carry out the following tests to give you peace of mind.
Depending on the type of appliance these are the tests we carry out.... Earth Continuity This test checks that the connection betwesen the earth pin in the mains plug of the appliance and the metal casing of the appliance is satisfactory and is of sufficiently low resistance. Insulation Resistance This is used to verify that the mains supply pins are adequately insulated from earth. IEC Lead Test IEC Leads are tested in 3 stages for continuity, insulation and polarity. Protective Earth Conductor Current This test displays the current flowing down the earth line of the EUT. This is measured by looking at the difference in current flowing in the live and neutral conductors. Touch Current This displays the current that would flow if a person touched the appliance. PAT Testing Process The perception held that PAT Testing is sticking a plug into a machine couldn’t be much further from the truth. We have found that over 80% of faults have been identified by a Formal Visual Inspection. Sadly, this is something that many companies regularly skip to trim costs. We have put together a file for you to download here that covers the basics, but it is important that you entrust the safety of your environment to experienced and meticulous testers at Ayrnet. Every unmoulded plug must be opened and checked and should look like this…
Our technician will check for dents, rust, cracks, pressure gauge operation, safety pin being straight (a bent pin will not come out!), anti-tamper seals intact, correct weights, blocked, worn or cracked hose, discharge test dates, head-cap degradation, replace o-rings and washers, check pressure relief valves, location, wall-mounting, labelling, etc. Upon completion, a maintenance label will be stuck on the back with the correct information filled in. This label will have the service company contact details on it. In addition, we will email you a thorough report & certificate in PDF format detailing the work that was done and the parts used as well as filling in your fire log book. 
Portable Fire Extinguisher Maintenance Annual Servicing It’s not just common sense, but a requirement to have your Fire Extinguishers maintained and serviced annually. Ayrnet’s technicians are all qualified to the British Approvals for Fire Equipment (BAFE) standards and provide a comprehensive service to our clients without asking them to pay over the odds. Furthermore, we do not charge a call out fee for annual maintenance and we never suggest replacement extinguishers without a valid reason. This sets us apart from many in our industry.
The trainers are all BAFE qualified with a minimum of 10 years’ training experience and hold the Level 3 Award in Education & Training (PTLLS). The courses last for 2 hours, are relaxed, informative with delegates receiving concise, jargon free handouts as reference material. At the end of the course, everyone will know their responsibilities and have the confidence to carry them out safely. This training can be built into your maintenance agreement with us, saving you even further.
Fire Warden / Marshall Training
This is the way we do business. Many of our customers have been with us for the 10 years that we have been going because we have built our reputation upon winning their trust. Anyone working for Ayrnet will have completed a gruelling Customer First training programme and will have bought into our ethos of being honest and capable professionals. When a replacement actually is necessary, our customers benefit from our procuring quality equipment in bulk at wholesale prices. We do not believe that our customers should have to boost our profits for this, so we work very hard in securing the best deals with the top suppliers.
Maintenance Process
You can comply with the law and keep your Fire Extinguishers fully maintained and operational, but without trained Fire Wardens or Fire Marshalls, your equipment and safety can be in the hands of novices. Ayrnet Marketing our sister company carry out this training either at your place of work or in our Conference Room in Stevenston to enable your key staff to understand the importance of this knowledge.
Emergency Escape Lighting Emergency lighting is lighting for an emergency situation when the main power supply is cut and any normal illumination fails.  The loss of mains electricity could be the result of a fire or a power cut and the normal lighting supplies fail. This may lead to sudden darkness and a possible danger to the occupants, either through physical danger or panic.
Emergency Escape - Lighting that part of an emergency lighting system that provides illumination for the safety of people leaving a location or attempting to terminate a potentially dangerous process beforehand. It is part of the fire safety provision of a building and a requirement of The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. Standby Lighting - that part of an emergency lighting system provided to enable normal activities to continue substantially unchanged. This guide does not include standby lighting, as it is not a legal requirement and is a facility that may or may not be needed, depending on the use and occupancy of the premises, etc. Escape Route Lighting - that part of an emergency escape lighting system provided to ensure that the means of escape can be effectively identified and safely used by occupants of the building. Ayrnet technicians are trained by and qualified to the Fire Industry Association standards to design and test Emergency Escape Lighting. We provide a comprehensive Fire Safety service ensuring that you have peace of mind that you are compliant and providing a safe environment for your employees and visitors.
The British Standard provides the emergency lighting designer with clear guidelines to work to. BS 5266-1: 2011 embraces residential hotels, clubs, hospitals, nursing homes, schools and colleges, licensed premises, offices, museums, shops, multi-storey dwellings, etc. Although this standard recommends the types and durations of emergency lighting systems relating to each category of premises, it should be remembered that the standards are the minimum safe standards for these types of building and that a higher standard may be required for a particular installation.
Portable Extinguishers - Siting
Maintenance and Testing of Emergency Escape Lighting
Existing fire extinguishers conforming to BS 5423 remain acceptable until such times as they need to be replaced at the end of their useful life.
Particular care needs to be taken following a full discharge test. Batteries typically take 24 hours to re-charge and the premises should not be re-occupied until the emergency lighting system is fully functioning unless alternative arrangements have been made. See BS 5266-827 for more information. It is good practice to keep a record of tests – a fire safety logbook is commonly used for this purpose.
Fire Fighting and Facilities on Premises
The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 requires that appropriate testing is performed to maintain compliance of the system. The system should include adequate facilities for testing and recording the system condition. These need to be appropriate for the specific site and should be considered as part of the system design.
Whenever possible portable fire fighting equipment should be grouped to form a fire point. The fire point should be clearly indicated so that it can be readily identified. In premises that are uniform in layout extinguishers should, whenever possible, be located at the same point on each floor. If for any reason extinguishers are placed in positions hidden from direct view their position should be indicated by suitable signs, as described in BS 5499 : Parts 1 and 3.
No person should have to travel more than 30 metres from the site of a fire to reach an extinguisher.
Test facilities often take the form of a ‘fishtail’ test key inserted in a special switch either near the main fuse board or adjacent to relevant light switches.
New fire extinguishers must conform to British Standard EN3, which requires all extinguishers to: Be coloured red;To have a zone or block of colour, comprising 5% of the body, whose purpose is to indicate the type of extinguishing medium. This block should be located on the front of the extinguisher so that it can be seen from 180° when correctly mounted;Have a capacity of 1, 2, 3, 6, or 9 litres / kg; andUse standard labelling using pictorials to describe the fire classification and use.
All premises should be provided with a means for fighting fires that can be easily and safely used by the occupants. The following information may give you guidance under Article 13 of the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005. It is without prejudice to anything which may be required by an enforcing authority. In deciding the appropriate type and quantity of such equipment, consideration should be given to the size of the building and the nature of the materials likely to be found there. It must be remembered that extinguishers are provided primarily for use by suitably trained persons to tackle a fire in its early stages.
Most existing systems will need to be manually tested. However, some modern systems have self-testing facilities that reduce routine checks to a minimum. Depending on your type of installation you should be able to carry out most of the routine tests yourself. The test method will vary. If you are not sure how to carry out these tests you should contact your supplier or other competent person.
Location of Portable Fire Fighting Equipment
Typically, testing would include:
Portable Appliance Testing (PAT) is the term used to describe the examination of electrical appliances and equipment to ensure they are safe to use. Most electrical safety defects can be found by visual examination but some types of defect can only be found by testing. A relatively brief user check (based upon simple training and perhaps assisted by the use of a brief checklist) can be a very useful part of any electrical maintenance regime. However, more formal visual inspection and testing by a competent person may also be required at appropriate intervals, depending upon the type of equipment and the environment in which it is used The frequency of inspection and testing depends upon the type of equipment and the environment it is used in. For example, a power tool used on a construction site should be examined more frequently than a desk lamp in an office.  There is no legal requirement to label equipment that has been inspected or tested, nor is there a requirement to keep records of these activities. However, keeping records combined with properly labelled appliances can be a useful management tool for monitoring and reviewing the effectiveness of the maintenance scheme – and to demonstrate that a scheme exists. The law simply requires an employer to ensure that their electrical equipment is maintained in order to prevent danger. It does not say how this should be done or how often. Employers should take a risk-based approach, considering the type of equipment and what it is being used for. If it is used or moved regularly e.g. a floor cleaner or a kettle, testing (along with visual checks) can be an important part of an effective maintenance regime giving employers confidence that they are doing what is necessary to help them meet their legal duties. HSE provides guidance on how to maintain equipment including the use of PAT and we have provided a small library below for your information.
The links below offer pretty much all you’ll ever need to know about Fire Safety.
Fires are classified in accordance with British Standard EN 2 as follows:   Class A Fires involving solid materials where combustion normally takes place with the formation of glowing embers.Class B Fires involving liquids or liquefiable solids.Class C Fires involving gases.Class D Fires involving metals.Class F Fires involving cooking oils or fats.
Extinguishers should be sited in conspicuous positions where they are visible to anyone using an escape route.They should be mounted on brackets fixed to the wall or some other convenient structural feature.Ideally, larger extinguishers should be mounted so that they can be conveniently de-mounted for use without undue effort or risk of injury. In effect, this will mean mounting the extinguisher with the handle no more than 1m from the floor but, circumstances may dictate variations from this recommendation.Smaller and more easily handled extinguishers may be mounted with the handle about 1.5m from the floor level.Suitably constructed floor cradles may be acceptable in certain locations.Where there are special risks, extinguishers should be grouped conveniently in positions where any user will not be placed in danger whilst attempting to use them.Other suitable positions include near exits to rooms or storeys, corridors or lobbies, stairways and landings.Extinguishers should not be sited behind doors or inaccessible positions such as deep recesses or in cupboards.It is also necessary to consider their exposure to extremes of heat or cold as well as the risk of accidental damage during the normal day-to-day use of the premises. The operation of an extinguisher will be affected by temperature and this could even cause accidental discharge.In premises where theft and vandalism are a problem, extinguishers may be located in secure areas, but always under the supervision of trained staff.
Note:
a daily visual check of any central controlsa monthly function test by operating the test facility for a period sufficient to ensure that each emergency lamp illuminates an annual full discharge test.
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Message to Ayrnet…..
Company Name * Address * Postcode * Contact Name * Email Address * Telephone Number Month PAT Testing due * Approx. number of appliances * Price currently paid per appliance or Total price currently paid Current PAT Testing company used Month Emergency Lighting Annual Maintenance Testing due * Month Annual Fire Extinguisher Maintenance due * Other comments *  
Carbon Monoxide Detection
Many multi-sensor fire detectors detect carbon monoxide (CO) as well as smoke and / or heat. Under international codes and standards the CO cell needs to be functionally tested with a CO stimulus from the protected area through the detector vents to the sensor. In the same testing process as for smoke, the only way to verify that a CO detector is working is to apply CO directly to the sensor of your detector. We use CO concentration levels high enough to activate an alarm, but low enough not to pose danger to user health and as with the smoke detection test, there is no harmful residue, it is non-toxic as well as non-flammable.
Functional checking is achieved by introducing a smoke, or simulated smoke, stimulus from the protected area through the vents of a detector to the sensor. It is required by all national standards around the world and testing by electronic means that do not involve this test is not sufficient to comply. We apply a clean, synthetic smoke delivering particles replicating those found in smoke directly on to the sensor on to your detector to make sure that your system responds. There is no harmful residue, it’s non-toxic as well as non-flammable. 
Ayrnet use the market leading Solo equipment when carrying out Fire Alarm Tests. The triangle of fire (below) comprises heat, oxygen and fuel. By taking one or two of these elements away, the fire goes out. That’s why Ayrnet carry out a comprehensive test to check that your alarms react to Carbon Monoxide (CO), heat and smoke. 
Heat Detection
Functional checking of heat detectors, with a genuine heat source, is now required by major national standards around the world.  Testing with heat sources not designed for the purpose can be both dangerous and damaging. Ayrnet’s equipment is designed specifically for the purpose, providing a genuine professional’s solution at surprisingly low cost.
Smoke Detection
Fire Alarm Testing Ayrnet use the market leading Solo equipment when carrying out Fire Alarm Tests. The triangle of fire (below) comprises heat, oxygen and fuel. By taking one or two of these elements away, the fire goes out. That’s why Ayrnet carry out a comprehensive test to check that your alarms react to Carbon Monoxide (CO), heat and smoke. Smoke Detection Functional checking is achieved by introducing a smoke, or simulated smoke, stimulus from the protected area through the vents of a detector to the sensor. It is required by all national standards around the world and testing by electronic means that do not involve this test is not sufficient to comply. We apply a clean, synthetic smoke delivering particles replicating those found in smoke directly on to the sensor on to your detector to make sure that your system responds. There is no harmful residue, it’s non-toxic as well as non-flammable. Carbon Monoxide Detection Many multi-sensor fire detectors detect carbon monoxide (CO) as well as smoke and / or heat. Under international codes and standards the CO cell needs to be functionally tested with a CO stimulus from the protected area through the detector vents to the sensor. In the same testing process as for smoke, the only way to verify that a CO detector is working is to apply CO directly to the sensor of your detector. We use CO concentration levels high enough to activate an alarm, but low enough not to pose danger to user health and as with the smoke detection test, there is no harmful residue, it is non-toxic as well as non-flammable. Heat Detection Functional checking of heat detectors, with a genuine heat source, is now required by major national standards around the world. Testing with heat sources not designed for the purpose can be both dangerous and damaging. Ayrnet’s equipment is designed specifically for the purpose, providing a genuine professional’s solution at surprisingly low cost.  
Emergency Escape Light Testing
Electrical Inspection  & Testing
Portable Fire Extinguisher Maintenance
Our technician will check for dents, rust, cracks, pressure gauge operation, safety pin being straight (a bent pin will not come out!), anti-tamper seals intact, correct weights, blocked, worn or cracked hose, discharge test dates, head-cap degradation, replace o-rings and washers, check pressure relief valves, location, wall-mounting, labelling, etc.
Upon completion, a maintenance label will be stuck on the back with the correct information filled in. This label will have the service company contact details on it.In addition, we will email you a thorough report certificate in PDF format detailing the work that was done and the parts used as well as filling in your fire log book.
Emergency lighting is normally required to operate fully automatically and give illumination of a sufficiently high level to enable all occupants to evacuate the premises safely. Most new buildings now have emergency lighting installed during construction; the design and type of equipment being specified by the architect in accordance with current Building Regulations and any local authority requirements
Portable Extinguishers - signage:
Company Name * Address * Postcode * Contact Name * Email Address * Telephone Number Month PAT Testing due * Approx. number of appliances * Price currently paid per appliance or Total price currently paid Current PAT Testing company used Month Emergency Lighting Annual Maintenance Testing due Month Annual Fire Extinguisher Maintenance due Other comments